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By Birgitte Bundesen Svarre

When presented with the idea of a guided tour of food carts in downtown Manhattan, the Scandinavian skeptic in me thought: “hmmm standing up, eating hot dogs and pretzels for an hour, hmmm…”. Luckily, the Scandinavian skeptic was taken by surprise, and it wasn’t just because of the great food. It was also the tales told by the food cart owners and the Urban Oyster guides. And not the least what I am going to present in images here: the people at the food carts. We visited four food carts on the tour and it was as if we went from one small world to another – all on the sidewalks of New York.

Note: my comments on ethnic origin are not based on precise information; I did not ask people their origin. My guess are only meant to describe the worlds on the sidewalks as I experienced them.

Stop 1. Veronica’s, Caribbean, female customers who seem to be from the Caribbean region and surroundings. Food: Hot, spizy, like your Caribbean mother would make it, with lots of love…

Stop 2. Adel, King of Falafel, men standing in line to taste Adel’s No1 falafel, a mix of Indian, Pakistan, Arab origins

Stop 3. Vegetarian, a white middle aged woman, vegetables, ginger, notice the food vender certificate next to the woman, which can take up to 30 years to obtain, or rather that was before New York City decided to close the waiting list due to the popularity

Stop 3. Vegetarian, a white middle aged woman, vegetables, ginger, notice the food vender certificate next to the woman, which can take up to 30 years to obtain, or rather that was before New York City decided to close the waiting list due to the popularity

Stop 4. Souvlaki. The greek food stall, primarily men that could look as if they have Greek origins, voted best food cart by the public in 2010




http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindcaster-ezzolicious/4179455963/sizes/m/

Image by Amsterdamize

Cycling is usually a low-carbon way to travel – but it depends on what you eat.

This has lead Guardian journalist and blogger, Mike Berners-Lee to investigate just what difference your food makes to the impact cycling a mile has on the environment.

The carbon footprint of cycling a mile:

  • 65g CO2e: powered by bananas
  • 90g CO2e: powered by cereals with milk
  • 200g CO2e: powered by bacon
  • 260g CO2e: powered by cheeseburgers
  • 2800g CO2e: powered by air-freighted asparagus

Berners-Lee makes the folowing conclusion:

“Is cycling a carbon-friendly thing to do? Emphatically yes! Powered by biscuits, bananas or breakfast cereal, the bike is nearly 10 times more carbon-efficient than the most efficient of petrol cars. Cycling also keeps you healthy, provided you don’t end up under a bus. (Strictly speaking, dying could be classed as a carbon-friendly thing to do but needing an operation couldn’t due to the massive footprint of the health service.)”

Read the full story on the Guardians blog on biking.

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